We’re advocates for our audience.
Our communication makes people’s lives easier, not more difficult. We’re on their side and put their interests before our own.

We shoot for excellence.
If it’s worth putting into words, it’s worth getting right. Then there’s grace.

We’re user-friendly.
We answer: who, what, when, where, why, and how? We include easy-to-find information for any next steps. Clear beats clever all day.

We avoid insider lingo.
We won’t use words that are hard to understand. We explain terms and any phrases that may be confusing to someone who has never stepped inside a church.

We say less to communicate more.
We keep it brief, knowing people are much more likely to engage with concise content.

We don’t sell.
We understand people tune out advertising and manipulation. We inform, cast vision, and share experience. We describe real outcomes that can benefit our audience.

We communicate what we want for people, not what we want from them.
We’re not giving people to-dos. We’re presenting them with opportunities.

We’ve got personality.
We let it shine through in our communication by being authentic, informal, sincere, positive, and fun.


DIY Quick Checklist

  • What’s redundant or unnecessary? How much can I eliminate without losing meaning? What can I save for later?

  • Lead with the most important thing. Keep the most important, foundational information at the top.

  • Has my messaging acknowledged real-life circumstances to motivate a next step? (Think pain-point)

  • What do I want to happen as a result of this communication? What is the one thing I am asking people to do? Is it clear? Is it easy to find? Easy to use? (Think solution to pain-point)

  • What’s redundant or unnecessary? How much can I eliminate without losing meaning? What can I save for later?

  • Avoid overused words. Tired phrases and words that are used too often fail to communicate anything at all since we start tuning them out. Example: encourage and equip, fun and exciting event, etc.

  • Who is the one person I’m writing this for? Am I tailoring my content for them? Am I answering the questions they would ask, or am I subjecting them to the information I think they need to know?

  • Does my communication pass the “so-what” filter? Can it simply and honestly answer the ultimate question in my audience’s mind: “What’s in it for me?”

  • Would someone who is new to Westside Family Church understand the words and names I’ve used? 

  • What’s redundant or unnecessary? How much can I eliminate without losing meaning? What can I save for later?